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Archive for the ‘Goat’s milks’ Category

Banon

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October 22nd, 2017 Posted 6:27 pm

Brown paper packages, tied up with string, this is one of our favourite things. Like the unassuming gift, wrapped in brown paper, that turns out to be something wonderful, Banon does not disappoint.

Banon

Banon

This little cheese is wrapped in chestnut leaves, tied up with raffia. Unwrapping reveals a soft, cream coloured cheese with a dusty white mould flecked dark spots from contact with the leaves.

The smell is slightly goaty, musty, with a smell of autumn leaves (unsurprisingly).

The pate is a greyish creamy white with a soft, smooth texture like liquid velvet.

This texture is just wonderful, that velvety pate is orally sensual. The flavour is delicately goaty, slightly nutty, with a slight bitterness. It has a seductive quality that is hard to describe, suffice to say it is ultimately satisfying and very moreish.

Purchased from Champagne + Fromage, London.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2017

(5/5)

Posted in French, Goat's milks, Soft

Sister Sarah

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July 2nd, 2017 Posted 6:01 pm

Intolerant to cow’s milk, but don’t like goatiness? This is the cheese for you.

With its striking orange, annatto coloured rind and smooth, silky white pate this cheese is just so seductive.

Sister Sarah

Sister Sarah

Ahem… although it’s, normally… coated with annatto, (a bright orange natural colour, added to many orange cheeses, such as Red Leicester), the more astute reader may have noticed that our particular review piece is somewhat lacking in this feature..

Moving swiftly on, the pate is very white (ok, it’s not a good photo either), with an oily sheen and a mild milky smell.

The texture is deliciously soft and smooth, yielding sensually in the mouth.

Delicately milky and extremely satisfying. There’s a slight chalkiness and a very gently tangy spiciness that leaves a very, very subtle burning sensation, with hints of nuttiness and chocolate. Although this is a goat’s milk cheese, there is not even the slightest hint of goatiness.

It could be argued that the qualities of this cheese a so subtle that it could easily be dismissed as unremarkable. However, take the time to really taste and savour it and it becomes a very satisfying experience.

Produced by the High Weald Dairy

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2014.

(4/5)

Posted in English, Goat's milks, Hard

Tipsy Billy

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February 3rd, 2015 Posted 7:21 pm

Specially commissioned by La Cave à Fromage, one could possibly guess from the name that this is a goat’s cheese washed in some sort of alcohol… and you would be correct (though we seriously hope that “Billy” is only a general reference to goat rather than specific).

Tipsy Billy

Tipsy Billy

This starts life as a basic unpasteurised goat’s cheese made in the West Midlands. Then La Cave à Fromage snatch it away from its innocence and imbibe it with cider matured in whiskey barrels. It is then locked away in a dark, cool room for three to four weeks.

The results is rather spectacular.

The orangey coloured rind is very wet and sticky, with whitish cream pate, that darkens toward the edges.

The smell is like a delicate reminder of the boys locker room at middle school. Sweaty, but without the pungency puberty brings.

The texture thick and creamy, but the flavour consists of a whole list of adjectives: sweet, fruity, tangy, sharp, salty, goaty and perfumy. The latter being enhanced with a sip of white wine.

In conclusion, a very complex, but highly enjoyable cheese. Definitely one worth trying.

 

Produced by La Cave à Fromage

Purchased from La Cave à Fromage, Brighton.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2013

(4/5)

Cerney Vine

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August 25th, 2014 Posted 5:34 pm

We came across this at the Sturminster Newton Cheese Festival. It was attracting a lot of attention. A sweet smelling, wet lump, wrapped in soggy vine leaves, then neatly tied up with a raffia bow… Oh, and it’s washed in Brandy… which could have had something to do with its popularity.

Cerney Vine

Cerney Vine

Opening the cellophane wrapper the first thing that you notice is how wet it is. It is seriously soggy. It smells sweet and fruity, like medlar fruit and capers.

The paste is a brilliant white with the same sort of texture as a Ricotta.

The flavour is clean, fresh and sharp. There are definite hints of alcohol and fruit, but it dissipates quickly, leaving you wondering if it was ever there in the first place.

Unusually for a goat’s cheese, there is no goatiness whatsoever.

All in all a very enjoyable cheese with a definite element of the unusual.

Produced by Cerney Cheese

Purchased from The Sturminster Newton Cheese Festival

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2013

(4.5/5)

Le Chabichou du Poitou

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August 3rd, 2014 Posted 7:50 pm

Wrinkly and dusted with a white bloom, a two inch tall, slightly conical drum, this little cheese comes from around Poitiers. Apparently, it dates back to the Moorish invasion of that area in 732. Some Arabs stayed behind, and with them, their herds of goats… and, well, this was France, so they simply had to make cheese from the milk.

Le Chabichou

Le Chabichou

This is classified as an aged fresh cheese (see the Glossary for an explanation) and is typically 2-3 weeks old when ready.

Unusually for a goat’s cheese, it only has a faint whiff of goat. It does however have a strong smell, that can only be described as mousey. Sweet, pungent… and, well… like mouse pee.

The interior has a soft, thin buttery layer whilst the inner pate is quite firm, like slightly dried out putty. Once cut, there is a very strong goaty smell.

The taste starts very fresh and sharp and contains concentrated essence of goat, then it turns quite bitter, leaving a lingering and slightly burning aftertaste.

Olympia loves goat’s cheese and loved this, I wasn’t quite so keen (hence the middle of the road score).

Very goaty, so if you like goat’s cheese, you will probably enjoy this.

 Purchased from the French cheese stall outside Brighton Station,

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2012

(2.5/5)

Pennard Ridge Red

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January 12th, 2014 Posted 6:00 pm

If you were only allowed to look, you’d swear it was Red Leicester. If you were only allowed to smell, you’d swear it was an aged Gouda. If you were only allowed to taste, you’d swear it came from the Alps. But… what is really surprising, is that this cheese is made from goat’s milk.

Pennard Ridge Red

Pennard Ridge Red

It really does look like Red Leicester, but it’s not just the annatto added for colour, the texture is similar and so is the way it crumbles.

The rind smells of old damp stone cellars, the pate itself, slightly caramelly (a bit like aged Gouda).

The flavour is richly complex and deeply satisfying. The caramel and damp stone overtones combine with a hint of raw turnip and a sweet, nutty, alpine cow’s milk flavour that would make you seriously question its West Country, caprine origins. There is an almost unnoticeable hint of goat. So much so, that it would so easily be missed unless you were actually looking for it.

By all accounts, this was an attempt by the Somerset Cheese Company to create a Red Leicester like cheese from goat’s milk, for the lactose intolerant, but it is so much better.

All in all, a very satisfying cheese.

Produced by the Somerset Cheese Company

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2013

(4/5)

Posted in English, Goat's milks, Hard

Gleann Oir

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April 14th, 2013 Posted 8:51 pm

This rugged looking cheese from Tipperary, covered with white mould flecked with yellow may look a little off-putting to all but the ardent cheese buff. It is, however, one of those cheeses that may convert those that turn their noses up based on appearances.

Gleann Oir

Gleann Oir

The strong smell of ammonia given off by its gnarled rind, some may also find offensive, but it is worth persevering.

The pinkish, grey interior is soft and waxy with very little smell, just a gentle hint of goat.

It has a delicate, very pleasing flavour a bit like Morbier with a wonderful nuttyness and farmyard flavour. Wine brings out the goatiness which, otherwise would not be apparent. All together a very satisfying experience.

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2012

(4.5/5)

Posted in Goat's milks, Hard, Irish

Crottin de Chavignol

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October 26th, 2012 Posted 7:51 pm

Crottin de Chavignol literally means “horse dung of Chavignol”, Chavignol being a small village right in the middle of France in the department of Cher. Luckily, this description refers to its shape and size rather than its flavour.

Only 50mm across, this little goat cheese has a yellow rind, but as it matures, it develops a dusting of mould that will provide a colourful transition from yellow, to white, to blue/green, through to grey.

Crottin de Chavignol

Crottin de Chavignol

It’s paste is white and soft, but becomes crumbly as it ages.

The one we had, (pictured) was just starting to develop the blue mould. (Yes, I know, it’s not a good picture :oops: )

Creamy, but with a typical goat’s cheese chalkiness to the texture. There was no instant hit of flavour. Instead, the flavour gradually built up becoming quite strongly goaty with lemony overtones. All in all, a pleasant experience.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2012

(3.5/5)

Murcia al Vino

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June 3rd, 2012 Posted 10:29 pm

This very attractive looking cheese with its pale almost translucent paste and beautiful red/maroon rind promises much.

Murcia al Vino

Murcia al Vino

Spanish made, it looks, in some ways, similar to a Manchego, but made with goat’s milk and washed in red wine.

This leads to high expectations, but sadly these are not met. It has surprisingly little flavour. Slightly goaty, slightly reminiscent of Manchego, but mainly dull and tasteless like a Provolone. The only exciting bit is the rind which has a slightly perfumed flavour.

Purchased from Tesco.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2012.

(1/5)

 

Posted in Goat's milks, Hard, Spanish

Ribblesdale Blue Goat

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May 27th, 2012 Posted 10:44 pm

This Yorkshire made hard goat’s milk cheese, wrapped in its dark green wax coating, with brilliant white paste and dusty sage green veins, is immediately visually striking.

Ribblesdale Blue Goat

Ribblesdale Blue Goat

On first tasting, there is a subtle goatiness and a smooth creamy texture with the fresh flavour that some goat’s cheese have. As the goatiness quickly fades, it makes way for a distinct blueness, that is again subtle and delicate.

Its complex mix and broad range of flavours are unusual but pleasing, as they do not compete but compliment one another in an extremely satisfying manner. Sat atop a Cornish Wafer and eaten with a glass of crisp white wine, this cheese is a truly delightful experience.

UPDATE – Be aware! – This cheese is better when young. If it gets too old, it can turn to the dark side. It loses it’s beautiful subtleties, becomes extremely overpoweringly blue in flavour with the throat attacking Cabrales effect.

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia 2012.

(5/5)

Posted in Blue, English, Goat's milks, Hard