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Archive for the ‘Irish’ Category

Milleens

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February 3rd, 2019 Posted 6:41 pm

Now there’s a cheese that looks like a proper rustic, traditional farmhouse cheese that has been made for many generations. It is however, a relatively modern creation, first produced in 1976.

Milleens

Milleens

From the rugged, but lush Atlantic coast of the furthest south western corner of Ireland. The Beara Peninsular, County Cork, is home to the herd of Friesian cows that provide the milk for this cheese, giving it almost alpine like qualities.

On the outside, its course orangey, light brown rind smells somewhat like a Parisian concrete pissoir: earthy with an overpowering ammonia content.

The pate, is rubbery, soft and yielding, with a waxy feel and look. The smell is pleasantly milky with no trace of the ammonia that so dominates the rind.

The smooth, waxy texture has a mild, slight bitter edge at first bite, that quickly fades, revealing a subtle Morbier like herbaceous, alpine flavour with vague, but elusive hints of caramel that you’re never really certain were there.

All in all, it’s a good cheese. Pleasant, but not terribly exciting.

Manufactured by Milleens Cheese Ltd.

Purchased from Cheesology

Reviewed by Nick and Olympia, 2018

(3/5)

Crozier Blue

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December 14th, 2014 Posted 7:41 pm

With a name like Crozier, you might expect this cheese to be French, but it is in fact, Irish. A crozier is a shepherd’s crook (Which is actually taken from the French word croisier, meaning cross bearer. A crosier, or crozier, is the staff with a cross or crook, that signifies an abbot or bishop. But, enough of that, this is a cheese blog, not an etymology class.)

Crozier Blue

Crozier Blue

Crozier is  made by Cashel Farmhouse Cheesemakers and the name was chosen because the Rock of Cashel is where St. Patrick’s crozier is set in a statue… and this is a sheep’s milk cheese (you see what they did there? ;-) ).

It has a thin grey, sticky rind and a sweaty, cream coloured pate with blue / grey veining.

The smell is somewhat reminiscent of a schoolboy’s dirty kit bag. Sweaty, but lacking the pungency of masculine pheromones. However, don’t let this put you off.

The texture is strangely grainy, like semolina pudding. The flavour salty and sharp with quite a bite and a subtle sweetness that creeps in. Usually blue cheeses are best when taken with sweeter wines, but this combination produces a peculiar metallic aftertaste. Maybe it’s the sweetness of the cheese, but a drier wine is much better.

Having said all this, Crozier is a good cheese. It’s strange quirks make it an interesting addition to the cheeseboard.

Produced by Cashel Farmhouse Cheesemakers.

Purchased from La Cave a Fromage, Brighton.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2014.

(3/5)


Additional

A couple of weeks after purchase, it improved considerably. The texture became smoother and creamier and the flavour, much more mellow and satisfying. As a result, we had to re-evaluate our rating.

(4/5)

Posted in Blue, Hard, Irish, Sheep's milk

Gleann Oir

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April 14th, 2013 Posted 8:51 pm

This rugged looking cheese from Tipperary, covered with white mould flecked with yellow may look a little off-putting to all but the ardent cheese buff. It is, however, one of those cheeses that may convert those that turn their noses up based on appearances.

Gleann Oir

Gleann Oir

The strong smell of ammonia given off by its gnarled rind, some may also find offensive, but it is worth persevering.

The pinkish, grey interior is soft and waxy with very little smell, just a gentle hint of goat.

It has a delicate, very pleasing flavour a bit like Morbier with a wonderful nuttyness and farmyard flavour. Wine brings out the goatiness which, otherwise would not be apparent. All together a very satisfying experience.

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2012

(4.5/5)

Posted in Goat's milks, Hard, Irish

Irish Porter

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March 25th, 2013 Posted 12:01 am

Wow! What visually stunning cheese! With its chocolate coloured wax rind and dark brown and gold terrazzo like appearance, this promises to be an exciting discovery. Made with porter house ale, produced by Guinness, it just tantalises you in anticipation of what lies in store.

Irish Porter

Irish Porter

However, looks and pedigree sometimes amount to very little, and this is sadly the case here. This is the Celine Dion of the cheese world, beautiful to look at, but no personality.

It has a milky, mild cheddar flavour with a slight hint of bitterness, but where’s the porter house ale?

It would make a fantastic centerpiece for any cheeseboard, and is bound to impress and initiate cheesy conversation, but for the hardend cheese afficionado… forget it.

Purchased from Cheese Please, Lewes.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia, 2013

(2/5)

Ardrahan

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April 22nd, 2012 Posted 10:55 pm

Irish semi-soft cows milk cheese with a pale orange, brine washed rind.

Though this cheese is quite smelly, it is smooth and creamy with a mild flavour.

A previous purchase of this cheese had a strange grassy flavour with a bitter aftertaste, neither of which were present in this latest acquisition.

 

 

 

 

 

Purchased from Field & Forrest Delicatessen, Lindfield.

Reviewed by Nick & Olympia.

(3/5)

Posted in Cow's milk, Irish, Semi-soft